Sneak Peek: A T. Rex Named Sue

“We have a T-Rex!”

-John Hammond, Jurassic Park

Last night, Reno Dads had the opportunity to get a sneak preview of The Discovery’s newest exhibit: A T. Rex Named Sue. Sue is the largest, most complete T. Rex ever discovered and The Discovery has her life-sized replica on display. The exhibit opens to the public today (May 27th), adding yet another Jurassic benefit to Discovery members (we know that T. Rex lived during the Cretaceous period, so save your hate mail/comments).

T. Rex in the Flesh (or bones)

Walking into the museum, visitors are greeted by a life-sized replica of a Tyrannosaurus Rex fossil that makes you stop in your tracks and think, “don’t move, she can’t see you if you don’t move.” Sue is massive. Longer than a school bus from head to tail, you begin to imagine how enormous she must have been with her muscle and skin intact. You can truly understand why T. Rex was the king (in this case, queen) of the dinosaurs. After starting in awe from every possible angle, there is even more to see (and do) down the hall.

Fun for the Kids

IMG_0253Leaving the remarkable T. Rex skeleton, you and the family can make your way to a room full of interactive exhibits and activities for the kids. From a rotating replica of Sue’s skull to a giant fossil-filled sandbox, kids have a blast learning what life was like for a T. Rex and even for that of her prey. One activity allows you to look through the eyes of a T. Rex and then through the eyes of a Triceratops, comparing the site picture of predator and prey. Lastly, check out the merchandise. Our kids left with a new T. Rex t-shirt and the book “A Dinosaur Named Sue.” Take a look at the embedded video for a taste of the exhibit and the activities our families enjoyed. When you’re finished, go see her yourself! This is a unique opportunity for northern Nevadans and the exhibit will be going extinct at the end of this year.

Be sure to go see Sue and let us know what you thought about her in the comments.

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